best-time-to-go-to-england

Best time of the year to go to enchanting England

Weather to go or not! 😉

We all know the English are obsessed with talking about the weather in their country and with good reason, the weather there is so unpredictable.

Whether to go in Spring or summer though, is dependent on your reasons for your trip in the first place, the weather definitely shouldn’t be one of them!

You can have snow in the spring, just when the weather is supposed to get warmer, warm sunshine in the autumn even late into the winter months and rain throughout the summer.  Nothing ever goes to plan!

There’s a definite north/south divide in this ancient land and never more so when discussing the weather.

People from the south believe the north is generally a few degrees colder than the south, throughout the year.  The south is supposed to be rainier, so the bottom line is when packing for your trip to this memorable island, just pack for every weather possibility!

When planning your trip then to these fair isles, try to go with an open mind and then you won’t be disappointed with having a soggy camping trip in August or a tour of London through the snow in April!

Overall, spring (late march to early June) and autumn (September to November) are the best times to visit if you aren’t up for the rain.

The summer does tend to be much more touristy particularly in the larger cities and isn’t a great time to visit if you don’t like hot and sweaty crowds when the temperatures can go up to 30 degrees.

What kind of traveller are you?

The time of year you should visit this curious country depends on you…

Will you be travelling alone?

Do you have a family to think of – toddlers or teenagers?  Grans and gramps?

Are you sporty – a cyclist, a skier, a surfer?

Or are you a walker?

Do you want to see historical England or are you more into fashion, shopping and music?

Once you’ve decided your ’type’, it might help you when thinking about what time of year to visit and the weather which would suit your visit.

After all, you don’t want torrents of rain when you visit Stonehenge or a National Trust Garden of beauty.

You don’t want boiling heat and sweaty, overcrowded transport if you are trying to travel with a wheelchair.

So, knowing the unpredictable weather of this incredible island just might make or break your holiday…

Winter travellers

For those who enjoy travelling in really cold winters, think Scandinavian countries, so perhaps England isn’t the best place for you to visit at this time of year – unless you head for the hills, that is.

If you love the romance of the beautiful, crisp white mountains you’ve read about of Wales and Scotland and of course ‘up north’, then your planned trip in the winter months is likely to be a success.

‘Up north’, which is to a southerner anywhere north of Watford, then you can discover the charismatic countryside of the Midlands and further north to Yorkshire and beyond. 

The further you go, the whiter the weather – remember the average temperatures are between 5-6 degrees (41-42F), if not lower.

December is usually cold and damp and there is little daylight – in northern Scotland there are fewer than 7 hours!)

And you can see the Northern Lights in Scotland!

In these northern cities, regardless of the weather, everything remains open and it’s the best time for sightseeing as those more faint-hearted have stayed at home!

Family fun

If, however, you are intending to take the whole family for a trip to ‘good ol’ Blighty’, and you don’t want to spend your entire trip looking for brollies and Macintoshes, then plan your trip in the warmer months.

May and June are usually warm and typically drier than the winter months.

July and August are traditionally the summer months in England and supposed to be the hottest and driest months of the year so could be a good time for the family to visit.

However, this is the period of school holidays and so can be very busy to travel at this peak holiday time.

It’s a matter of being ultra-organised at this time of year as queuing for exhibitions, museums and galleries in the hot, sweaty cities is not much fun with young children or teenagers who’d rather be shopping.

Tubes, trams and other inner-city modes of transport will be bursting with tourists and the Brits aren’t very good with air conditioning, unlike the rest of Europe…

Families may find therefore, September the best month to visit – schools are back, people are back at work, so the crowds have started to disperse but the weather is still warm.

September is traditionally the time for an ‘Indian summer’ – the weather is still warm, sometimes even hot.

There are many harvest festivals and markets at this time as well which families may enjoy participating in so there are plenty of cultural events on which give the family the chance to see Britain in an unconventional tourist way.

Spring into England

Nowhere in the world can really compete with Britain in the spring, however.

The months of March to June are ideal for any traveller to this historical island.

A season of colourful flowers, English woodland covered in blankets of bluebells and stunning snowdrops, this is when English countryside comes into its own.

Simply hundreds of gorgeous gardens open their gates to visitors, and everyone from young families to older couples can enjoy the temperate climes whilst they muse the delights of the season, enjoying impromptu picnics and coffees in the cafes.

This could be said to be the best time to travel to England too.

There are many fantastic holiday packages and Easter deals you can get as this is not traditionally known as the travel season.

During the spring you’ll find better bed and breakfast offers in both the cities and the countryside as this is the beginning of the tourist season.

Forewarned is forearmed!

So, just like the English persona, so is its weather – unpredictable but worth the effort!

With just a bit of planning, you can have the most amazing holiday in England – just don’t forget your brolly!

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